Tenzi Frenzy!

We are away for the summer at a cottage, with no internet or TV, which I usually love. We’ve already read lots of books, frolicked in the waves, swam to the Big Rock,  sailed to Seagull Island, canoed…dumped the canoe and had lots of good old fashioned fun; but my heart still felt the pitter-patter of excitement when I saw the clouds roll in, because that meant we could drive to the nearest town and spend the morning at Chapters!  

Don’t you love rainy days at Chapters? (Borders would probably be the US equivalent).The boys love playing with Thomas the train in the kids section, and looking at all the books, while I finally get a chance to peruse the latest best-sellers in person, instead of on Amazon! We go to the library every week, but it’s just not the same as a road trip to Chapters. And when we went yesterday, I felt like I hit the jackpot with my new find: TENZI!

Best. Game. Ever!!! Kevin and Steve (the game’s designers), made known by a little piece of paper in the game box with their story on it, may not have thought of the mathematical implications when they came up with the idea for the game, but kudos to them for unwittingly designing a brilliant game suitable for 3-103 year olds!!

Here is the general gist of the game, and I quote: “Everyone gets 10 dice. Then everyone rolls until someone gets all their dice on the same number.” Simple, right? Why am I so excited by this new find? Because of its GINORMOUS educational value! It’s like this game was conceived specifically with the pre-kindergarten to grade 2 curriculum in mind,  yet it’s intended for everyone!

Here’s why I love it:

Subitizing!

Subitizing is the ability to recognize number patterns without counting. Rory quickly grasped what the dot patterns stood for and although he still counted the dots on each new turn, the repetition of looking for the same dot pattern reinforces his learning. I am confident that after a few more rounds, he will quickly and easily know the dot patterns for 1-6 without counting.

Counting on!

If you have 3 of the same number and get one more, now you have 4. Rory was learning and Practicing math skills without even knowing it! He already has developed one to one correspondence and cardinality, but now we’re extending his knowledge. What is 3 and 3 more, or 4 more, or 5 more?! Because each turn is different, he is continually practicing different amounts of counting on.

Decomposition and recomposition of 10 (a very important bench-mark number)!

Because the goal of the game is to get 10 dice all on the same number, you are constantly looking for two numbers that make up 10: those you already have with the same number on them and those you have yet to roll. Rory quickly saw when he needed one more to make 10, and then we looked to see that he already had 9. Or he had 5 of the same number and needed 5 more. And that leads to….

Addition!

Decomposition of 10 is the building block to addition and although we didn’t concentrate on it today (it was our first time after all!), eventually we will use this game to practice our 10 facts. We can easily adapt it to practice our 5 facts first, just play with 5 dice each instead and yell, Fivzi!

Fun!

This game is fun for the whole family!  Oliver got in on the action too but only to yell “Tenzi! “ and steal our dice to make a tower, but I’m sure he’ll see the math value soon!! It was me that finally drew the game to a close after almost an hour; Rory could have kept playing forever!

So Kevin and Steve (fortuitous mathematical master-minds that you are!), thank you for a fun and easy game that everyone can play. It looks like you two have a whole new market to exploit and hopefully I’ve inspired some new fans here!

If you want to know more, check out their website at www.ilovetenzi.com. Thank heavens for rainy days!!

Have other great math games that aren’t actually meant to be math games?

Post them in the comments section below!

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Making Math Meaningful with Manipulatives!

If you’re not a teacher, you may not be familiar with the term manipulatives, but you can probably infer what they are. Manipulatives are models that help children think and reflect on new ideas in math. They include resources that allow children to explore, question, guess and check, but more importantly, to play with the problem. Counters, toys, linking cubes, abacuses are just a few examples.

Why use manipulatives?

We all know the old adage: we learn better by doing and math is no different! Manipulatives give students, of all ages, opportunities to have a hands-on approach and develop deeper understanding of concepts. Research has shown benefits to using manipulatives all through life! That means, don’t be in a rush to move your child into more abstract ways of solving problems. There is a natural progression to manipulatives and you need to assess your child’s readiness before pushing them to a more abstract level. When choosing materials, they should be sequenced from concrete to abstract and from 3-D to 2-D. See the chart below for more information.

Transitioning from concrete to abstract manipulatives (Charlesworth, 2000)

1) Start with real objects. Sensorimotor stage.
2) Move to real objects supplemented by pictures. Pre-operational stage
3) Once the first two are mastered, you can use cutouts of real objects. This is the transition from 3-D to 2-D, but the objects can still be manipulated. Pre-operational stage.
4) Now move to pictures. Transitional stage
5) Finally (and much later!) use paper and pencil. Concrete operations stage

So where do virtual manipulatives fit on this spectrum? Good question! I’m not sure! My guess is that they act like real objects because you can move them, but because they are 2-D, they might be more on par with the cut-outs level, in terms of concreteness (see step 3 above). Let’s see what Rory thinks. I’m going to get Rory to do a task with real objects and then do the same task with on-line manipulatives. Then we’ll see what he has to say! This task is an introduction to addition but it would also be great to use for lessons on one:one correspondence, decomposing numbers, counting on and  cardinality.

Well it looks like Rory prefers virtual manipulatives. It may have been the novelty of it or the fact that the computer images acted more life-like than the real objects! He claims that the boat was more real compared to my egg carton version and he liked that the bears kept looking at him (in case you couldn’t tell)! The important thing is that children are given the freedom to choose their own manipulative so that they aren’t restricted to one method. That way, they can discover their own way to reach a solution that makes sense for them. If he likes the on-line tool, on-line tool it is! But I’ll make sure he has the real objects on stand-by in case he’d like to use them as well.

Looking for manipulatives? Look no farther!

Click here for a list of manipulatives that teachers often use with this age group!

Are you a parent? The great thing is that anything can be a manipulative! You don’t need to run to a teacher supply store in order to help your child.

Click here for a list of great things to use at home!

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